Lavinia symmetricus subditus

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General Information
Common Name: 
Monterey roach
FID: 
CLS05
Status: 

Conservation Status in California: Class 3, Near-threatened (Moyle et al. 2011). Although apparently in no danger of extinction, populations could decline rapidly and disappear in many areas, as the result of alterations to streams and changes in climate.

Life History: 

Life History and Habitat Requirements: Life history and habitat requirements of this subspecies are very similar to that of the Central California roach. Please see that account.

Habitat Requirements: 

Life History and Habitat Requirements: Life history and habitat requirements of this subspecies are very similar to that of the Central California roach. Please see that account.

Distribution: 

Distribution: Monterey roach are confined to the Pajaro, Salinas and San Lorenzo River systems, tributaries of Monterey Bay. Within the Pajaro watershed, Monterey roach do not occur in the mainstem Pajaro River but are present in Uvas Creek, Llagas Creek upstream of Chesbro Reservoir, North Fork of Pacheco Creek upstream of Pacheco Reservoir, Arroyo Dos Picachos and in the San Benito River and it tributaries including Tres Pinos, Laguna, and Clear Creeks, among others (Smith 2007). In the Salinas River system roach have been extirpated from the mainstem habitats that they historically occupied and now occur primarily in tributaries such as Arroyo Seco (J.J. Smith perrs. comm. 2009) and Gabilan Creek (Hager 2001). Roach are native to and numerous in the San Lorenzo River and Pescadero Creek and are present in smaller numbers in Soquel Creek where they may have been introduced. Snyder (1913) did not collect roach in Soquel Creek but he sampled only a single site and may have missed them.

Abundance Trends: 

Trends in Abundance: Monterey roach are numerous but have been extirpated from some reaches of the Pajaro and Salinas river systems due to habitat alteration and lowered water quality (Smith 1982, 2007). Long term trends are not known but populations are likely fewer and more fragmented than they were historically. No data specific to Los Padres National Forest was located.

Description: 

Description: This subspecies differs from Lavinia s. symmetricus by having fewer dorsal (7-9, mean 8.0) and anal fins rays (6-8, mean 7.3), fewer scales in the lateral line, slightly shorter fins, a slightly more robust body and a thicker caudal peduncle (Snyder 1913, Murphy 1948c, Hopkirk 1973). Coloration is deep olive above, silvery to whitish beneath. See Central California roach for a more complete description of general roach morphology.